bossche-school-side-table-by-jan-de-jong-dom-hans-van-de-laan-1-copyimg_0381

Jan de Jong (Nl, 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl, 1904-1991)

high table (two available) – Green stained wood with nails.

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed. The artist Wim van Hoof worked with the two architects proposing different colour schemes for their projects. The original olive green surface visible on these tables derived from one of those schemes.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor.

These tables are part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired. They were made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo in the 1960s (full provenance including photos of the pieces in-situ. is available). The church was one of the best examples of modernist churches of the era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

What I do, I do not want, and what I want, I can not do” [Dom Hans v.d.Laan]

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

 

Advertisements

P1230021

Ilmari Tapiovaara (Finland, 1914-1999)

Solid lacquered beech & pine wood

‘Pirkka’ series table and stool, Laukaan Puu. 1950s

The Pirkka range was designed by Finnish interior architect and designer Ilmari Tapiovaara in 1955 for Laukaan Puu. The design alludes to the forms of Finnish rustic furniture.  Tapiovaara was always seeking for new solutions to improve everyday objects. During his long career, Tapiovaara created dozens of iconic objects loved by the public. Tapiovaara is especially revered as a master of characteristic and human objects and surroundings. The designs of Ilmari Tapiovaara have proved their quality by remaining a part of our daily lives as interesting, still relevant, functional and aesthetic pieces of furniture.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

POA.

1790

P1210794

 

Anonymous (U.K. 1920s-30s)

Small constructivist plywood side table

We are still researching this small table. It has similarities to various under-appreciated early British modernist designer/makers from the early c20th including Gerald Summers, Isokon/ Jack Pritchard etc. and captures the spirit of the early British constructivist architects and artists.

A handful of designer/makers like Summers and Isokon used plywood before the WWII. Unlike most other furniture makers of the day, they did not feel compelled to cover it in a veneer of a more exotic wood. In the early 30s Summers began to experiment with a special kind of plywood called “aeroplane ply” and, as Martha Deese wrote in the Journal of Design History, “this exceptionally thin and flexible material had a revolutionary impact on Summers’s emerging style” (Martha Deese, “Gerald  Summers and Makers of Simple Furniture,” Journal of Design History, vol. 5, no. 3 (1992), pp. 183–205). During the period plywood enabled designers to evolve an organic idiom of curved surfaces and curvilinear outlines, which exploited the inherent capabilities of this pliable material. (*Cerio,2009)

The base of its sculptural design is made from 3mm aeroplane ply. The top that swivels around the base in three section can be folded away or left up as shown. The top is a thicker plywood.

54cm High x 55cm diameter.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

*Information on Summers gained from Gergory Cerio whose article ‘Bold, Bright and Unappreciated can be found at:- http://themagazineantiques.com/article/british-furniture-at-mid-century/

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

Poul Kjærholm (Denmark 1929-1980)

PK55 Ash wood and brushed steel dining table

1970s production. (Unmarked)

The use of steel and Allen bolts to connect the frames allowed Kjaerholm to avoid the, sometimes, imprecise process of welding. It also fulfilled his desire to show how the frames were connected, thus providing a clear legibility to his designs, and led him towards creating his first work desk and compatible chair – the PK 55 and PK 11, which appeared in 1957.

The simple looking build of the PK55 table belies a much more interesting design than is apparent at first glance. The steel base frame is actually composed of four lengths of flat steel, intersecting at each corner, with the short end leg propping up the longer, width-spanning leg. Each leg element is held together yet simultaneously pushed slightly apart with Allen bolts to give the base frame an even lighter profile and also to reveal the four separate planes.

This work table features an ash table top and satin brushed steel frame.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

Marcel Breuer (Hungarian, 1902-1981)

B10 table for Thonet.

A modernist table composed of an eight section chrome plated frame supporting a wooden table top.

The B 10 table was designed by Marcel Breuer in 1927 for his own company Standard Möbel, and since 1930 the piece has been manufactured by Thonet under the same designation. This is an early production circa 1930s (although the top has been restored at some point) The colour is a very pale blue/green. There is no Thonet company badge/label.

67 x 74 x 74 cm

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

isobar_115f832b-188f-4048-b13b-4d98591d123e
Marcel Breuer & FRS Yorke, Isobar restaurant 1937

 Walter Gropius (German, 1883-1969) redesign of Isokon plywood table/stool 1930s

A stool/table with removable tray top, manufactured by the Venesta Plywood Company, Estonia, 193os for Isokon, UK.

The stools were originally designed for the ‘Isobar’ restaurant/lounge within the modernist Lawn Road flats, London (see image). The Isobar restaurant was realised in 1937 after the communal kitchen in the building was converted to a design by Marcel Breuer and F.R.S.Yorke from the Modern Architectural Research Group (the MARS group). Trays were made for some of the stools so that customers cold take the tray to the bar when fetching drinks.

Alistair Greave’s 2004 book Isokon for Ease for Ever describes this rare variation of the plywood stools as having tighter designed cut out shapes than the regular versions seen in the image of the Isobar. He attributes this adaptation of the design to Walter Gropius who during the mid-1930s was in exile in London working for the Isokon group alongside British architects like Maxwell Fry and others. Their designs continued the dogmas of modernist ethics begun earlier at the Bauhaus; simplicity, economy and aesthetic beauty.

It retains its original circular tray built with a thinner plywood edge (they normally always have thicker edged trays to prevent warping) The thin edge is thought to have been part of Gropius’s redesign that may not have been put into production because of the structural difficulties. Both sections are marked by Venesta (the Estonian company employed by Pritchard to manufacture the Isokon plywood furniture)

Currently not available.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

pair-rare-dutch-wim-den-boon-minimalist-side-tables-1950s_4
Den Hague interior, 1950s

 W.(Wim) Den Boon (Netherlands, 1912-1968)

Pair of triangular side tables, 1950s

chromed steel and formica board.

The Dutch architect Wim Den Boon alongside Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that fitted in seamlessly with the functionalist designs of the thirties.

By the 1950s Den Boon broke with ‘Group &’ and established himself as an independent furniture designer in The Hague. From that time and throughout the 60s he was responsible for many interiors and renovation projects, particularly in The Hague. These two tables (one shown) were designed as part of the interiors of one of those projects – The tables can be seen within the complete interior of a house in the images of Peter Voge’s biography of Den Boon.

As seen, the design of these tables was ahead of its time – There are visible influences of Rietveld and De Stijl or even the Scandinavian designs of Kjaerholm. At his best Den Boon designed some of the most futuristic interiors during the 1950s. His furniture is rare to find and most of it can only be experienced through photographic documentation.

49cm x 49cm x 49cm x 43cm High.

Ref: Peter Voge “Wim Den Boon Binnenhuisarchitect”

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.