P1180902

Dutch modernist reception desk. Circa 1930s-50s.

Painted steel. Beech wood slats and composite stone top.

The exact provenance of this desk is unknown but it reputedly came out of a shop/store in Amsterdam during the mid-c20th. It has affinities with Gerrit Rietveld’s designs of the era.

It shows signs of age and use – the rubber stops are very dry and worn, the steel has old over painting.

Some minor sympathetic restorations.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

 

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Dutch modernist work desk

1930s. Designer/ manufacturer unknown.

We are currently researching this desk. It has similarities to the Dutch Pander furniture company. Gerrit Rietveld was also reputed to have designed a few private commissions in bright colours.

It has its original paintwork that has faded in places to a tangerine/ coral colour. It has a grey/green cloth top surface. It shows some signs of age and use as would be expected and would benefit from some TLC.

Currently not for sale.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

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Gerrit Rietveld (Dutch 1888-1964) style / attributed shelving unit
Dutch 1930s – Modernist shelving unit.
provenance: Johanna Erna Else Schröder (1918 – 1992)
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Johanna Erna Else Schröder (known as Han Schröder) lived in the  in Utrecht, the Netherlands, together with her mother, Truus  Schröder- Schrader who was also an interior decorator. The house was designed in 1924 by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld who became a friend of Schröder’s and an important influence on her future work. While a teenager, she worked on furniture design with both Rietveld and with Gerard van de Groenekan. In 1936, she attended the  Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, graduating as an architect in 1940.
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This small De Stijl / Art Deco / Modernist shelving unit was previously owned by Han Schroeder /Schröder. After the death of Han the family auctioned off her belongings including this table. It is possibly a Gerrit Rietveld design – although a definite attribution can not be given.
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POA
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P1220098

Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Small ‘Stolwijk’ table for ‘t Spectrum 1954-55

Original grey painted plywood and steel rod.

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

This model (Stolwijk) was only produced for a very limited period in the mid-50s

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

Please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

P1210564 (1)

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ADO workers 1930s – Photo – Collection of the Coda museum Apeldoorn. NL.

Ko Verzuu (Netherlands 1901-1971)

ADO wooden toy chairs – Circa. 1930s

Between 1925 and 1955 influenced by the Dutch Modernist De Stijl painters and designers Ko Verzuu designed many children’s toys. His designs were inextricably bound up with innovations in art, health care and pedagogy in the first half of the 20th century. In 1920, the sanatorium Berg en Bosch was founded in the sanctuary on the outskirts of Apeldoorn. This sanatorium offered rest and care to tuberculosis patients.

Once patients had recovered from their illness, returning to regular working life often proved to be difficult. In order to prepare patients better for their reintegration, the sanatorium developed a modern treatment: occupational therapy.

One of the ways this took shape was in the production of wooden toys. These toys were given the name ADO; an abbreviation that initially stood for Arbeid door Onvolwaardigen (Labour by the Deficient), but was wisely changed to Apart Doelmatig Onverwoestbaar (Special Functional Indestructible) in 1962.

These chairs are examples of the more seldom seen larger scaled furniture made by ADO.

POA

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

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Dutch 1930s – Modernist shelving unit.
provenance: Johanna Erna Else Schröder (1918 – 1992)
.
.
Johanna Erna Else Schröder (known as Han Schröder) lived in the  in Utrecht, the Netherlands, together with her mother, Truus  Schröder- Schrader who was also an interior decorator. The house was designed in 1924 by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld who became a friend of Schröder’s and an important influence on her future work. While a teenager, she worked on furniture design with both Rietveld and with Gerard van de Groenekan. In 1936, she attended the  Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, graduating as an architect in 1940.
 .
This small De Stijl / Art Deco / Modernist shelving unit was previously owned by Han Schroeder /Schröder. After the death of Han the family auctioned off her belongings including this table. It is possibly a Gerrit Rietveld design – although a definite attribution can not be given.
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.
POA.
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.
please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.

dom1-1

 Jan de Jong (Netherlands, 1917-2001) / Dom Hans van der Laan (Netherlands, 1904-1991)

Hall stand – Original grey painted pine wood. 1970s.

Dom Hans van der Laan was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor. In the late 1950s the two men worked closely together in the Reconstruction Period after WWII to create a body of work as part of the construction of the churches in the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.