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Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Original painted plywood wall cabinet. 1950s

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

Unique modernist wall cabinet was made for a 1953 exhibition Ons Huis, ons t’huis, (Our House, us at Home) held at De Bijenkorf warehouse in Amsterdam. The cabinet was exhibited at Wonderwood gallery’s exhibition of Stolle’s work in 2004 shortly before his death.

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Literature: Hein Stolle Architect Verteller Meubelontwerper  Publisher: Wonderwood, 2004 (book as illustrated above)

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Aldo van Eyck (Netherlands, 1918-1999)

Wall mounted modernist bench.

Rexine over wooden structure with painted steel supports.

This is 1 of 2 Dutch commissioned 1950s wall mounted benches designed by architect Aldo Van Eyck. Some provenance available. The bench is thought to have been designed and made as a private commission in the 1950s.

Aldo van Eyck was an award winning architect from the Netherlands and a member of CIAM. He was one of the most influential protagonists of the Structuralist architectural movement. Van Eyck lectured throughout Europe and northern America propounding the need to reject Functionalism and attacking the lack of originality in most post-war Modernism. Van Eyck’s position as co-editor of the Dutch magazine Forum helped publicise the “Team 10” call for a return to humanism within architectural design.

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Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Armchair 1948

The Dutch architect Hein Stolle alongside Wim De Boon and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that echoed the spirit of 1930s functionalist design but made available to a wider audience.The use of softer woods and natural materials was possibly influenced by French designers like Charlotte Perriand.

Extremely rare (1 of only a few made) armchair with adjustable back produced for De Bijenkorf 1948 by the Dutch company  ‘t Spectrum.

Pine frame with rattan seat and back.

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P1180902

Dutch modernist reception desk. Circa 1930s-50s.

Painted steel. Beech wood slats and composite stone top.

The exact provenance of this desk is unknown but it reputedly came out of a shop/store in Amsterdam during the mid-c20th. It has affinities with Gerrit Rietveld’s designs of the era.

It shows signs of age and use – the rubber stops are very dry and worn, the steel has old over painting.

Some minor sympathetic restorations.

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ADO workers 1930s – Photo – Collection of the Coda museum Apeldoorn. NL.

Ko Verzuu (Netherlands 1901-1971)

ADO wooden toy chairs – Circa. 1930s

Between 1925 and 1955 influenced by the Dutch Modernist De Stijl painters and designers Ko Verzuu designed many children’s toys. His designs were inextricably bound up with innovations in art, health care and pedagogy in the first half of the 20th century. In 1920, the sanatorium Berg en Bosch was founded in the sanctuary on the outskirts of Apeldoorn. This sanatorium offered rest and care to tuberculosis patients.

Once patients had recovered from their illness, returning to regular working life often proved to be difficult. In order to prepare patients better for their reintegration, the sanatorium developed a modern treatment: occupational therapy.

One of the ways this took shape was in the production of wooden toys. These toys were given the name ADO; an abbreviation that initially stood for Arbeid door Onvolwaardigen (Labour by the Deficient), but was wisely changed to Apart Doelmatig Onverwoestbaar (Special Functional Indestructible) in 1962.

These chairs are examples of the more seldom seen larger scaled furniture made by ADO.

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