P1280816

Dutch 1950s abstract design wall hanging / rug.

Wool.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1280695

Alfred Hendrickx (Belgium c20th)

Mahogany wood and glass coffee table for Belform. 1950s.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1280656

Jan de Jong (Nl 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl 1904-1991)

Black stained large desk

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan.

POA

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1280375

Fer Semey (Belgium/Netherlands, early c20th)

Table for H.Pander and Sons. Netherlands 1930s
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In 1933 the controversial but now little known Belgian designer Fer Semey took over from Henk Wouda at the Pander company (H.Pander en Zonen /1850-1985 in The Hague, Zoetermeer and Rotterdam), and began to lead the company away from the companies distinguished middle class Hague School/Art Deco-like style for which it had become synonymous towards a more strictly cubistic one…(The Hague School had always incorporated De Stijl influenced geometrical elements, but Semey’s designs took it to a new level of aesthetic strictness and simplicity)
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90x90x53cm | Stamped with makers marks to underside

POA

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1230618

1960s small constructivist coffee trolley/table in the manner of Metz & Co.

This modernist table is composed of various sections that clip together using press studs normally found on clothing.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

POA.

P1280401

Franz Schuster (Austrian 1892-1972)

Modernist table designed by Viennese architect Franz Schuster during his time in Frankfurt as part of his Aufbau Möbel Programm (construction furniture range or ‘add-on-furniture’), which was furniture conceived as combination furniture for contemporary social housing.
In the mid-1920s, the Viennese architect and furniture designer Franz Schuster was called to Frankfurt together with other Viennese colleagues, including Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky. There Ernst May valued his expertise in the field of housing development. (Under the direction of Adolf Loos, he contributed to the design of several Vienna single-family housing estates and developed prototypes for residential houses and the so-called residential courtyards that still shape Vienna’s cityscape today). .
In Frankfurt, Schuster designed apartment buildings, schools, cinemas and swimming pools. But mainly he designed functional and space-saving type furniture for the compact housing estates and apartments of New Frankfurt.

Originally designed for Frankfurt settlements, the “add-on furniture” – forerunner of the modern Ikea system – quickly became well known and was sold well beyond the city limits until the 1930s / 65cm x 65cm x 50cm.

POA

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk