P1140774

Georges Jouve (France, 1910- 1964) &/for Marcel Asselbur

Rare 1950s wall mirror / coat hanger with four brass arms each with a black ceramic sculptural form attached. Made for and in part with Marcel Asselbur (the two collaborated throughout the 1950s to produce domestic items)

Good condition – minimal signs of age/use.

POA.

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p1210355

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) & Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991)

High back chair, 1967

Original olive green stained oak wood, brown leather with galvanised steel base and copper nails.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of the monk Dom Hans v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor. In the late 1950s the two men worked closely together in the Reconstruction Period after WWII to create a body of work as part of the construction of the churches in the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom Hans v.d.Laan’s concepts and ideas into other public and private pioneering buildings and spaces.

This exceptionally rare and early designed chair by Jan de Jong was made for the members of the city (counsel) of Budel in The Netherlands. De Jong designed the town hall and its furniture as a ‘gesamtwerk’ (a complete relational work based on hermetic planning). The chair is in superb original condition.

POA.

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p1150604

Poul Kjærholm (Denmark, 1929-1980)

PK9 Chairs – E. Kold Christensen, Denmark

chrome steel; leather

Kjærholm designed the ultimate functionalist furniture that was praised for its understated elegance and clean lines.

Kjærholm had a particular interest in various construction materials; especially steel, which he considered a natural material. In 1955, Kjærholm started collaborating with manufacturer E. Kold Christensen, which lasted until his death in 1980.

The PK9 series consist of splayed-legged bases on which a shaped seat is fully upholstered in black leather.

These are early edition chairs marked with the KC monogram and stamped Denmark.

POA.

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Poul Kjærholm (Denmark, 1929-1980)

PK31 Chairs – E. Kold Christensen

chrome steel; leather

Kjærholm designed the ultimate functionalist furniture that was praised for its understated elegance and clean lines.

Kjærholm had a particular interest in various construction materials; especially steel, which he considered a natural material. In 1955, Kjærholm started collaborating with manufacturer E. Kold Christensen, which lasted until his death in 1980.

The PK31 series rest on a matt chromium-plated spring steel base. The down-filled cushions are covered in your choice of leathers.

Both chairs are marked with the KC monogram and are in very good condition. The cushions are replacements professionally made in the 1980s.

POA.

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Marcel Breuer (Hungarian, 1902-1981)

Isokon Long Chair (early 1960s production) – Upholstered plywood

The Hungarian-born, modernist architect and furniture designer was one of the masters of Modernism. Breuer extended the sculptural vocabulary he had developed in the carpentry shop at the Bauhaus into a personal architecture that made him one of the world’s most popular architects at the peak of 20th-Century design.

Breuer came to Britain in the mid-1930s following the closure of the Bauhaus by the Nazis. He became acquainted with Jack Pritchard the owner of Isokon, who suggested he design furniture for the company. Pritchard had become interested in the plywood designs of Alvar Aalto and wanted to produce similar furniture himself. The Long Chair was an adaptation of a previous design for an aluminium framed chaise Breuer had produced in 1932.

The Long Chair was designed by Breuer for the British Isokon company in 1935-36 and is considered one of the most important pieces of furniture to emerge from the inter-war modern movement.

In 1968, Pritchard licensed John Alan Designs, based in Camden, London to produce the Long Chair – John Alan manufactured the chair according to larger measurements in order to make the chair more 60s-friendly. This chair is thought to pre-date that period as it still retains the older smaller measurements. The upholstery is showing distinct signs of age and use.

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POA.

P1200268

p1200265

Attributed to Bossche school architect Gerard Wijnen (Netherlands, 1930-)

Dutch minimalist bench/table.1950s.

Travertine marble and grey painted wooden base.

Bossche school architect Gerard Wijnen attended classes given by Hans Dom v.d Laan in the 1960s. Wijnen was not a prolific designer and his furniture was only made through commission from the architect which accounts for its scarcity.

100 cm wide x 40cm deep x 40cm high

POA.

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Jan de Jong (Netherlands, 1917-2001) & Dom Hans v.d. Laan (Netherlands, 1904-1991)

Large black painted wooden console table/ lectern

Dom Hans van der Laan was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor. In the late 1950s the two men worked closely together in the Reconstruction Period after WWII to create a body of work as part of the construction of the churches in the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces

This side table /lectern came out of the town hall in Budel, in The Netherlands designed by Jan de Jong. The town hall and its furniture were designed by him in 1967 as part of a complete environment. Although designed as a free-standing structure, it has an open section to the back  and there are holes drilled to the supporting structure inside for cables to run through…It also has a metal patch to one side and there is evidence of where microphones may have been attached to the top. This all points to it having been used as a working lectern at some time.

The black painted surface is a later colour added whereas the original colour might have been more of a greenish black.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.