p1190404

Manuel Marin (Spain, 1942-2007)

Abstract mobile table sculptures. Enamelled steel combined with metal wire.

Manuel Marin was an assistant to the English sculptor Henry Moore in the 1960s and later worked as an art restorer and gallery owner in New York. From around 1969 onward Marin became interested in mobiles as a form of sculpture and continued to produce them throughout his life until his death in 2007.

We have two sculptures available – Both sculptures are impressed with the artist’s name/signature.

POA.

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bossche-school-side-table-by-jan-de-jong-dom-hans-van-de-laan-1-copyimg_0381

Jan de Jong (Nl, 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl, 1904-1991)

high table (two available) – Green stained wood with nails.

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed. The artist Wim van Hoof worked with the two architects proposing different colour schemes for their projects. The original olive green surface visible on these tables derived from one of those schemes.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor.

These tables are part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired. They were made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo in the 1960s (full provenance including photos of the pieces in-situ. is available). The church was one of the best examples of modernist churches of the era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

What I do, I do not want, and what I want, I can not do” [Dom Hans v.d.Laan]

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p1210355

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) & Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991)

High back chair, 1967

Original olive green stained oak wood, brown leather with galvanised steel base and copper nails.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of the monk Dom Hans v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor. In the late 1950s the two men worked closely together in the Reconstruction Period after WWII to create a body of work as part of the construction of the churches in the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom Hans v.d.Laan’s concepts and ideas into other public and private pioneering buildings and spaces.

This exceptionally rare and early designed chair by Jan de Jong was made for the members of the city (counsel) of Budel in The Netherlands. De Jong designed the town hall and its furniture as a ‘gesamtwerk’ (a complete relational work based on hermetic planning). The chair is in superb original condition.

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p1150604

Poul Kjærholm (Denmark, 1929-1980)

PK9 Chairs – E. Kold Christensen, Denmark

chrome steel; leather

Kjærholm designed the ultimate functionalist furniture that was praised for its understated elegance and clean lines.

Kjærholm had a particular interest in various construction materials; especially steel, which he considered a natural material. In 1955, Kjærholm started collaborating with manufacturer E. Kold Christensen, which lasted until his death in 1980.

The PK9 series consist of splayed-legged bases on which a shaped seat is fully upholstered in black leather.

These are early edition chairs marked with the KC monogram and stamped Denmark.

POA.

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Poul Kjærholm (Denmark, 1929-1980)

PK31 Chairs – E. Kold Christensen

chrome steel; leather

Kjærholm designed the ultimate functionalist furniture that was praised for its understated elegance and clean lines.

Kjærholm had a particular interest in various construction materials; especially steel, which he considered a natural material. In 1955, Kjærholm started collaborating with manufacturer E. Kold Christensen, which lasted until his death in 1980.

The PK31 series rest on a matt chromium-plated spring steel base. The down-filled cushions are covered in your choice of leathers.

Both chairs are marked with the KC monogram and are in very good condition. The cushions are replacements professionally made in the 1980s.

POA.

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p1210335-copy
Wim Den Boon rush seated side chair 1950s

 

W.(Wim) Den Boon

(Netherlands, 1912-1968)

Ash wood with strung rush seat

The Dutch architect Wim Den Boon alongside Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that fitted in seamlessly with the functionalist designs of the thirties.

By the 1950s Den Boon broke with ‘Group &’ and established himself as an independent furniture designer in The Hague.

At his best Den Boon designed some of the most futuristic interiors during the 1950s. His furniture is rare to find and most of it can only be experienced through photographic documentation. This actual chair is shown next to a large table in the interior of Den Boon’s own residence in Peter Vöge’s 1989 book.

The design of this chair was inspired by traditional English spade chairs. The back rest/handle having a form similar to a garden spade. The design also shares many formal and conceptual elements with French and Scandinavian modernist designers of the period such as Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret.

Literature: W. (WIM) DEN BOON. 1912 – 1968. PUBLICATIONS: P. Vöge – Wim den Boon 1912-1968. Binnenhuisarchitect, Rotterdam 1989

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