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Marcel Breuer (Hungary/usa 1902-1981)

First edition model b34 cantilever chair from the 1920s/30s for Thonet.

These early versions had the curved under-seat to the frame.

The thick velvet type fabric to the seat and back have been on the chair for many years. They may be original to the chair as we have found Breuer chairs in the Bauhaus archives with the same type of fabric.

POA.

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Marianne Brandt

(Germany, 1893-1983)

GMF Touch light desk lamp, ca. 1933

It is common for the design of this rare lamp to be attributed to the Bauhaus designer Marianne Brandt for obvious reasons, including the fact that it is stamped GMF (Gotha Metal Fabric previously named Ruppel). The GMF company like Ruppel before them were known to have produced many of Brandt’s designs during the period. In addition the design is composed completely of geometric elements common to all of Brandt’s designs but especially because of the touch pad base that works as a switch. However, the original plastic shade we have never seen before which leads us to question whether this lamp was a particularly early production. Ultimately this is a rare version or a rare lamp – something of interest for any collectors of early modernism and modernist design.

It is lacquered in a seldom seen racing green colour and still has its original wiring in good condition.

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Poul Kjærholm (Denmark 1929-1980)

PK55 Ash wood and brushed steel dining table

1970s production. (Unmarked)

The use of steel and Allen bolts to connect the frames allowed Kjaerholm to avoid the, sometimes, imprecise process of welding. It also fulfilled his desire to show how the frames were connected, thus providing a clear legibility to his designs, and led him towards creating his first work desk and compatible chair – the PK 55 and PK 11, which appeared in 1957.

The simple looking build of the PK55 table belies a much more interesting design than is apparent at first glance. The steel base frame is actually composed of four lengths of flat steel, intersecting at each corner, with the short end leg propping up the longer, width-spanning leg. Each leg element is held together yet simultaneously pushed slightly apart with Allen bolts to give the base frame an even lighter profile and also to reveal the four separate planes.

This work table features an ash table top and satin brushed steel frame.

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Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Original painted plywood wall cabinet. 1950s

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

Unique modernist wall cabinet was made for a 1953 exhibition Ons Huis, ons t’huis, (Our House, us at Home) held at De Bijenkorf warehouse in Amsterdam. The cabinet was exhibited at Wonderwood gallery’s exhibition of Stolle’s work in 2004 shortly before his death.

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Literature: Hein Stolle Architect Verteller Meubelontwerper  Publisher: Wonderwood, 2004 (book as illustrated above)

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Illmari Tapiovaara (Finland, 1914-1999)

model 32, ‘Wilhelmiina’ chair

Oy Wilh. Schumann AB Finland 1960s.

The Wilhelmiina 32 chair was designed in 1959. The legs are constructed in laminated birch with “fountain bend”. The suspended seat and back are in black lacquered moulded plywood.

The design is reminiscent of Alvar Aalto, whom Tapiovaara counted as a strong influence. In World War II Tapiovaara designed dugouts and field furniture to the Finnish Army, a challenging task given that only local wood and simple tools could be used, and no nails or screws were available.

Manufacturers label to the underside.

Ref: Svenskberg, Aila (ed.): Ilmari Tapiovaara: Life and Design. Translated by Jüri Kokkonen. Helsinki: Designmuseo, 2014

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Jan de Jong (Netherlands, 1917-2001) & Dom Hans v.d. Laan (Netherlands, 1904-1991)

Large black painted wooden console table/ lectern

Dom Hans van der Laan was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor. In the late 1950s the two men worked closely together in the Reconstruction Period after WWII to create a body of work as part of the construction of the churches in the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces

This side table /lectern came out of the town hall in Budel, in The Netherlands designed by Jan de Jong. The town hall and its furniture were designed by him in 1967 as part of a complete environment. Although designed as a free-standing structure, it has an open section to the back  and there are holes drilled to the supporting structure inside for cables to run through…It also has a metal patch to one side and there is evidence of where microphones may have been attached to the top. This all points to it having been used as a working lectern at some time.

The black painted surface is a later colour added whereas the original colour might have been more of a greenish black.

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Dom Hans van der Laan (Netherlands, 1904-1991)

Pew/ Settle, 1950s

Oak wood and steel square ended nails

Dom Hans van der Laan was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture dealing with the plastic number, ideal size and relationship systems, were very influential.

Dom Hans van der Laan worked on many projects during the ‘Reconstruction Period’ after WWII to create a body of work. The architect and student of Dom Hans v.d. Laan, Jan de Jong, was able to translate many of his concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces prior to the late 1960s when many of the churches and religious institutions began to close down.

This oak pew or settle is a very early example of the designs by Dom Hans van der Laan. It came out of the Sint Stanislas chapel, build in 1955/56 in the city of Leiden. (building by Jan van der Laan, brother of Hans). The chapel was refurbished in the 1980s/90s at which time the pew was removed. It is totally original and has a superb warm patina.

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