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Dutch 1930s – Modernist shelving unit.
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provenance: Johanna Erna Else Schröder (1918 – 1992)
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Johanna Erna Else Schröder (known as Han Schröder) lived in the  in Utrecht, the Netherlands, together with her mother, Truus  Schröder- Schrader who was also an interior decorator. The house was designed in 1924 by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld who became a friend of Schröder’s and an important influence on her future work. While a teenager, she worked on furniture design with both Rietveld and with Gerard van de Groenekan. In 1936, she attended the  Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, graduating as an architect in 1940.
This small De Stijl / Art Deco / Modernist shelving unit was previously owned by Han Schroeder /Schröder. After the death of Han the family auctioned off her belongings including this table. It is possibly a Gerrit Rietveld design – although a definite attribution can not be given.
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POA.
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P1220655

Sybold van Ravesteyn (Dutch 1889-1983)

Nickel frames and sprung seats with slightly later upholstery.

An exceptionally rare set of six modernist chairs designed in 1928. They would have been manufactured after commission. The Centraal Museum in Utrecht has similar chairs in their collection.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

 

P1240468

Elmar Berkovich (Nl. 1897-1986)

Low table for Metz & Co. 1930s. Painted wood/ plywood and glass.

Elmar Berkovich was a leading furniture designer and interior designer in the Netherlands in the period 1925-1965. Before the Second World War he was employed by the Metz & Co company in Amsterdam, then at Philips in Eindhoven. In his interior assignments for large complexes such as factories, offices and hospitals, his attention was mainly focused on the ambiance, the lighting and the use of colour.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk / http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1240135P1240130

Elmar Berkovich (NL. 1897-1968)

A pair of very rare oak armchairs designed by Elmar Berkovich. Originally designed for the workers at the Shell factory although used in various environments thereafter.

They are made from an unidentified wood that is close to oak but has a very light weight to it. They were designed to be clipped together and exported easily for the factories in Dutch East Indies colonies. (Although the frames are now glued together).

POA.

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

Literature: Elmar Berkovich – meubelontwerper en interieurarchitect. Stichting BONAS.

P1180902

Dutch modernist reception desk. Circa 1930s-50s.

Painted steel. Beech wood slats and composite stone top.

The exact provenance of this desk is unknown but it reputedly came out of a shop/store in Amsterdam during the mid-c20th. It has affinities with Gerrit Rietveld’s designs of the era.

It shows signs of age and use – the rubber stops are very dry and worn, the steel has old over painting.

Some minor sympathetic restorations.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk