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Jan de Jong (Nl, 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl, 1904-1991)

high table (communion table) – Green stained pine wood with nails.

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed. The artist Wim van Hoof worked with the two architects proposing different colour schemes for their projects. The original olive green surface visible on these tables derived from one of those schemes.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor.

This table is part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired. They were made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo in the 1960s. The church was one of the best examples from that era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005 as part of an on-going series of closures.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

What I do, I do not want, and what I want, I can not do” [Dom Hans v.d.Laan]

POA.

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Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Original painted plywood wall cabinet. 1950s

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

Unique modernist wall cabinet was made for a 1953 exhibition Ons Huis, ons t’huis, (Our House, us at Home) held at De Bijenkorf warehouse in Amsterdam. The cabinet was exhibited at Wonderwood gallery’s exhibition of Stolle’s work in 2004 shortly before his death.

POA.

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Literature: Hein Stolle Architect Verteller Meubelontwerper  Publisher: Wonderwood, 2004 (book as illustrated above)

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Elmar Berkovich (NL. 1897-1968)

A pair of very rare oak armchairs designed by Elmar Berkovich. Originally designed for the workers at the Shell factory although used in various environments thereafter.

They are made from an unidentified wood that is close to oak but has a very light weight to it. They were designed to be clipped together and exported easily for the factories in Dutch East Indies colonies. (Although the frames are now glued together).

POA.

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Literature: Elmar Berkovich – meubelontwerper en interieurarchitect. Stichting BONAS.