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stolle_grande

 

Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Original painted plywood wall cabinet. 1950s

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

Unique modernist wall cabinet was made for a 1953 exhibition Ons Huis, ons t’huis, (Our House, us at Home) held at De Bijenkorf warehouse in Amsterdam. The cabinet was exhibited at Wonderwood gallery’s exhibition of Stolle’s work in 2004 shortly before his death.

POA.

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Literature: Hein Stolle Architect Verteller Meubelontwerper  Publisher: Wonderwood, 2004 (book as illustrated above)

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P1240971

W.(Wim) Den Boon (Netherlands, 1912-1968)Pair of triangular side tables, 1950s

chromed steel and formica board.

The Dutch architect Wim Den Boon alongside Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that fitted in seamlessly with the functionalist designs of the thirties.

By the 1950s Den Boon broke with ‘Group &’ and established himself as an independent furniture designer in The Hague. From that time and throughout the 60s he was responsible for many interiors and renovation projects, particularly in The Hague. These tables were designed as part of the interiors of one of those projects – The tables can be seen within the complete interior of a house in the images of Peter Voge’s biography of Den Boon.

As seen, the design of these tables was ahead of its time – There are visible influences of Rietveld and De Stijl or even the Scandinavian designs of Kjaerholm. At his best Den Boon designed some of the most futuristic interiors during the 1950s. His furniture is rare to find and most of it can only be experienced through photographic documentation.

Ref: Peter Voge “Wim Den Boon Binnenhuisarchitect”

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P1220920

P1220934

Dutch modernist work desk

1930s. Designer/ manufacturer unknown.

Unknown designer/maker (still researching this). Possibly H.Pander & Sons ~ Fer Semej, Elmar Berkovich or Paul Bromberg? We are currently researching this desk. Gerrit Rietveld was also reputed to have designed a few private commissions in bright colours although we would not be so bold as to attribute it to him).

It has its original paintwork that has faded in places to a tangerine/ coral colour. It has a grey/green cloth top surface. It shows some signs of age and use as would be expected and would benefit from some care and attention.

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IMG_6299

JJP Oud (Netherlands 1890-1963)
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Very rare JJP Oud chair from the director’s room of the Shell Oil company building, completed just after WWII in The Hague /1950.
Probably manufactured by HP Mutters & Sons or Eckhart’s meubelfabrik – Two companies that manufactured other known pieces from the building, now in the Boijman museum collection in Rotterdam.
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The chair/design and the design of the interior from which it came is fully documented in Elizabeth Reinhartz-Tergau’s excellent book on the architect published by Boijman van Beuningen museum in 1990 /p.155. (See image 2 which shows the documented image below the supporting text)

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P1240135P1240130

Elmar Berkovich (NL. 1897-1968)

A pair of very rare oak armchairs designed by Elmar Berkovich. Originally designed for the workers at the Shell factory although used in various environments thereafter.

They are made from an unidentified wood that is close to oak but has a very light weight to it. They were designed to be clipped together and exported easily for the factories in Dutch East Indies colonies. (Although the frames are now glued together).

POA.

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Literature: Elmar Berkovich – meubelontwerper en interieurarchitect. Stichting BONAS.