P1230803

Bas van Pelt (Netherlands, 1931-95)

EMS, My Home. 1930s

Bas Van Pelt design modernist chair/ possible prototype and if not, a very rare design.

Bas van Pelt began his shop ‘My Home’ in The Hague, Netherlands in 1931 and within a short period the company opened showrooms in other cities such as Maastricht and Amsterdam. The domestic interior design firm focused on producing high-quality modern interior furniture. Eventually right up until into the 1990s Bas van Pelt furniture and fabrics were also sold throughout The Netherlands and beyond by well-known modernist suppliers and manufacturers such as Thonet, D3, LOV and Gispen.

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P1230778

HWM (Henk) Hupkes (Netherlands 1920-2014)

The Dutch architect Henk Hupkes designed very few pieces of furniture. Most of the furniture he designed was for the twenty or so churches he designed throughout his lifetime.

This chair was designed by him in the 1966 for the Verzoeningskerk in Rijswijk. It is made from oregon pine

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P1230593

Bram van den Berg (Nl)

Stained pine wood chair.

A rare chair made after a commission from Bas van Pelt / The Hague. Circa 1953 for the youth hostel at Ockenberg-Kijckduin in The Netherlands.

This chair’s rudimentary but simple form and functional design typifies the spirit of the utilitarian design movement that surrounded the WWII period in Europe.

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P1230348P1230543

Ko Verzuu (Netherlands 1901-1971)

ADO small table – Circa. 1930s

Between 1925 and 1955 influenced by the Dutch Modernist De Stijl painters and designers Ko Verzuu designed many children’s toys. His designs were inextricably bound up with innovations in art, health care and pedagogy in the first half of the 20th century. In 1920, the sanatorium Berg en Bosch was founded in the sanctuary on the outskirts of Apeldoorn. This sanatorium offered rest and care to tuberculosis patients.

Once patients had recovered from their illness, returning to regular working life often proved to be difficult. In order to prepare patients better for their reintegration, the sanatorium developed a modern treatment: occupational therapy.

One of the ways this took shape was in the production of wooden toys. These toys were given the name ADO; an abbreviation that initially stood for Arbeid door Onvolwaardigen (Labour by the Deficient), but was wisely changed to Apart Doelmatig Onverwoestbaar (Special Functional Indestructible) in 1962.

Occasionally ADO made actual ‘real sized’ furniture – This is a very rare small table made by ADO during the 1930s. All original and in great condition…although the top shows signs of age as would be expected.

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bossche-school-side-table-by-jan-de-jong-dom-hans-van-de-laan-1-copyimg_0381

Jan de Jong (Nl, 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl, 1904-1991)

high table (two available) – Green stained wood with nails.

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed. The artist Wim van Hoof worked with the two architects proposing different colour schemes for their projects. The original olive green surface visible on these tables derived from one of those schemes.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor.

These tables are part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired. They were made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo in the 1960s (full provenance including photos of the pieces in-situ. is available). The church was one of the best examples of modernist churches of the era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

What I do, I do not want, and what I want, I can not do” [Dom Hans v.d.Laan]

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please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.