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Jan de Jong (Nl, 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl, 1904-1991)

high table (two available) – Green stained wood with nails.

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed. The artist Wim van Hoof worked with the two architects proposing different colour schemes for their projects. The original olive green surface visible on these tables derived from one of those schemes.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’. His theories on numerical ratios in architecture, in particular regarding the plastic number, were very influential.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan and it is claimed that in many way he surpassed his mentor.

These tables are part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired. They were made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo in the 1960s (full provenance including photos of the pieces in-situ. is available). The church was one of the best examples of modernist churches of the era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005.

http://www.vanderlaanstichting.nl/en/domhansvanderlaan/biography

What I do, I do not want, and what I want, I can not do” [Dom Hans v.d.Laan]

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Mart Stam (Netherlands 1899 – 1986)

Rush seated oak chairs

Van Der Kley, Badhoevedorp, Netherlands 1947

Stam was a Dutch architect, urban planner, and furniture designer. He was extraordinarily well-connected, and his career intersects with important moments in the history of 20th-century European architecture, including chair design at the Bauhaus, the Weissenhof estate and the Van Nelle Factory, an important modernist landmark building in Rotterdam, buildings for Ernst May’s New Frankfurt housing project then to Russia with the idealistic May Brigade, to postwar reconstruction in Germany. Stam was at the centre of c20th Modernism.

This set of four dining chairs were created for the “Goed Wonen”* .

*The Good Wonen Foundation in Amsterdam from 1946-1968 (The ‘Foundation Wonen’ until 1988) set itself the goal:

Living in the Netherlands to a higher level by improving the home furnishing in the broadest sense of the word, by promoting the production and distribution of furniture, upholstery, utensils, etc., which meet certain aesthetic, technical and social requirements .
An oak smoke chair is wrong; Rattan furniture are good. Flower wallpaper and heavy curtains are wrong; White walls and fresh shades are good!

The foundation wanted to free Dutch interior from the foul taste of the previous century. “Taste is a matter of education” was the idea behind the founding of the foundation in 1946. As a magazine and with model houses the foundation promoted the modern interior with light furniture – In this way the residents could maximise the potential of their environment and ultimately realise their own potential.

The ideas fitted well to the ideals of modernism; improving homes and furnishings as well as the people within them and society as a whole.

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Wim Den Boon rush seated side chair 1950s

 

W.(Wim) Den Boon

(Netherlands, 1912-1968)

Ash wood with strung rush seat

The Dutch architect Wim Den Boon alongside Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that fitted in seamlessly with the functionalist designs of the thirties.

By the 1950s Den Boon broke with ‘Group &’ and established himself as an independent furniture designer in The Hague.

At his best Den Boon designed some of the most futuristic interiors during the 1950s. His furniture is rare to find and most of it can only be experienced through photographic documentation. This actual chair is shown next to a large table in the interior of Den Boon’s own residence in Peter Vöge’s 1989 book.

The design of this chair was inspired by traditional English spade chairs. The back rest/handle having a form similar to a garden spade. The design also shares many formal and conceptual elements with French and Scandinavian modernist designers of the period such as Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret.

Literature: W. (WIM) DEN BOON. 1912 – 1968. PUBLICATIONS: P. Vöge – Wim den Boon 1912-1968. Binnenhuisarchitect, Rotterdam 1989

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Aldo van den Nieuwelaar (Netherlands, 1944-2010)

TC2 Floor lamp designed in 1969. White enamelled metal.

This early production lamp was produced by Artimeta Soest, Netherlands in 1972.

Inspired by the Dutch Modernist’s use of minimalist and geometric forms Aldo v.d.Nieuwelaar designed a range of products from furniture to carpet, sculptures and building schemes. From 1968 he designed a series of innovative fluorescent lighting manufactured in white and chromed steel tubes.

This floor lamp was from the TC series that were designed in 1969, originally produced in very small numbers. In 1972 Artimeta took these lamps into production – They produced limited numbers of the design until 1974 when production stopped.

The design includes the transformer in the base that acts as a counter weight. Amazingly they were also designed to be hung on the wall. They have holes underneath that enables them to clip onto the wall of so desired although they work best as minimalist light sculptures and give off a superb even warm light. The top section can be positioned by twisting the stem whilst the base remains fixed.

196 cm high 73 cm wide 15 cm deep (diameter of white tube 4cm)
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 POA
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website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk
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please click on the Merzbau logo (top left) to see all of our current listings.