IMG_7781

Jan Slothouber & William Graatsma (Dutch c20th+)

Five rare modular cubes from the 1970s.

Laminated plywood.

The Dutch team of Slothouber & Graatsma established themselves from the 1950s as artist/designers with the cube form as their key motif around which they developed various principles of cubic construction alongside multiples and variations thereof. Despite its restrictions they admired the cube for its clarity of form. They applied their thinking around it to a variety of objects, and artworks from small jewellery-scale 3d models and games to larger installation works.
Highly driven personalities, they considered themselves as discoverers of ‘the many applications of the democratic system of cubics’; a system that would ostensively act to counter the rise of the expressive individualism in post-WWII culture. (They later established the CCC_the Center for Cubic Constructions as a forum for promoting their ideas).
Due to their diverse and multidisciplinary output they were never to become global names – But they were a highly respected creative team (representing The Netherlands at the Venice Biennale in 1970)…Donald Judd for one was a great admirer of their work.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

 

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Paul Johann Bay (Switzerland 1889-1952)

Rare Anthroposophical carved ash wood table lamp
.
Bay was a collaborator of Rudolf Steiner and an independent architect in the offices of Dorlach, Goethaneum after 1914.

(With some provenance)

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

 

p1130715

Bas van Pelt (Netherlands, 1931-95)

EMS, My Home. 1930s

Rare early Bas Van Pelt design modernist armchair.

Bas van Pelt began his shop ‘My Home’ in The Hague, Netherlands in 1931 and within a short period the company opened showrooms in other cities such as Maastricht and Amsterdam. The domestic interior design firm focused on producing high-quality modern interior furniture. Eventually right up until into the 1990s Bas van Pelt furniture and fabrics were also sold throughout The Netherlands and beyond by well-known modernist suppliers and manufacturers such as Thonet, D3, LOV and Gispen.

This Bas van Pelt design has its original red paintwork over metal frame, sesal (woven grass fibre) slung seat and back. This chair is thought to be a very early edition of the design as it has a solid frame as opposed to a hollow one that all the later ones had. This of course makes it somewhat heavier than the later editions.

Price: 1400 euro.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1240971

W.(Wim) Den Boon (Netherlands, 1912-1968)Pair of triangular side tables, 1950s

chromed steel and formica board.

The Dutch architect Wim Den Boon alongside Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp formed the ‘Group&’ in the period shortly after WWII as part of the Dutch ‘Goed Wonen’ (Good living) movement. They focused on designing purist interior furniture and design that fitted in seamlessly with the functionalist designs of the thirties.

By the 1950s Den Boon broke with ‘Group &’ and established himself as an independent furniture designer in The Hague. From that time and throughout the 60s he was responsible for many interiors and renovation projects, particularly in The Hague. These two tables (one shown) were designed as part of the interiors of one of those projects – The tables can be seen within the complete interior of a house in the images of Peter Voge’s biography of Den Boon.

As seen, the design of these tables was ahead of its time – There are visible influences of Rietveld and De Stijl or even the Scandinavian designs of Kjaerholm. At his best Den Boon designed some of the most futuristic interiors during the 1950s. His furniture is rare to find and most of it can only be experienced through photographic documentation.

Ref: Peter Voge “Wim Den Boon Binnenhuisarchitect”

POA.

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk