P1170521

Ilmari Tapiovaara (Finland, 1914-1999)

model 32, ‘Wilhelmiina’ chair

Oy Wilh. Schumann AB Finland 1960s.

The Wilhelmiina 32 chair was designed in 1959. The legs are constructed in laminated birch with “fountain bend”. The suspended seat and back are in black lacquered moulded plywood.

The design is reminiscent of Alvar Aalto, whom Tapiovaara counted as a strong influence. In World War II Tapiovaara designed dugouts and field furniture to the Finnish Army, a challenging task given that only local wood and simple tools could be used, and no nails or screws were available.

Manufacturers label to the underside.

Ref: Svenskberg, Aila (ed.): Ilmari Tapiovaara: Life and Design. Translated by Jüri Kokkonen. Helsinki: Designmuseo, 2014

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

websitehttp://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

 

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P1270534

1960s Dutch child’s chair [unknown designer/maker]

Stained plywood. 39x39x35.5cm

POA

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http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1230593

Bram van den Berg (Nl)

Stained pine wood chair.

A rare chair made after a commission from Bas van Pelt / The Hague. Circa 1953 for the youth hostel at Ockenberg-Kijckduin in The Netherlands.

This chair’s rudimentary but simple form and functional design typifies the spirit of the utilitarian design movement that surrounded the WWII period in Europe.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

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Bas van Pelt (Netherlands, 1900-1945)

EMS, My Home. 1930s

Bas Van Pelt design modernist chair – The chair has been confirmed by the Bas van Pelt archives as being as a possible prototype and if not, a very rare design. Bas van Pelt often designed experimental furniture to place in the shop window and would only have the designs produced when the appropriate number of orders were received.

Bas van Pelt began his shop ‘My Home’ in The Hague, Netherlands in 1931 and within a short period the company opened showrooms in other cities such as Maastricht and Amsterdam. The domestic interior design firm focused on producing high-quality modern interior furniture. Eventually right up until into the 1990s Bas van Pelt furniture and fabrics were also sold throughout The Netherlands and beyond by well-known modernist suppliers and manufacturers such as Thonet, D3, LOV and Gispen.

POA.

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http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

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*1

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Gerard Wijnen (Netherlands, 1930-)

Armchairs, 1960 (Four available – one shown)

Bossche school architect Gerard Wijnen attended classes given by Hans Dom van der Laan in the 1960s. Wijnen was not a prolific designer and his furniture was only made through commission from the architect which accounts for its scarcity.

Wijnen was photographed sitting on one of these chairs as can be seen in the photograph from the ‘s-Hertogenbosch town archives collection.

POA.

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dom1

Dom Hans v.d. Laan (Dutch Benedictine Monk and Architect) & Jan de Jong (mid-late c20th)

This chair was part of a collection of furniture that we have acquired that was made for Sint Willibrordus church in Almelo, Netherlands in the 1960s (with full provenance). The church was one of the best examples of modernist churches of the era. Unfortunately it was knocked down in 2005.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

 

P1220891

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Alvar Aalto (Finland 1898-1976)

Rare version of the “Kakkonen” stackable armchair No. 2. /15. Manufactured by Oy Huonekalu-ja Rakennustyötehdas Ab, Turku, Finland. 1930s.

Finmar label to the underside.

A good example of Aaltos formative years and early designs; this chair is made from laminated and solid birch and retains its original black finish.

Co-designed by Alvar Aalto and Otto Korhonen in 1930, the chair was manufactured over the years as four differing versions. This version is the rarest of the four. The design is similar to one of other versions in that the front legs protrude at the side. However, the front edge of the seat on this version is formed as a more severe right angle as shown in the detail fig.1 (The other version with protruding legs was rounded at the front). It also has a small decorative corner feature when seen from the front that is reminiscent of traditional Chinese chairs.

The chair was illustrated in Alvar Aalto Designer, Alvar Aalto museum p.69 and in Alvar & Aino design collection Bischofberger p.21