P1290122

P1290108 (1)

P1290111 (1)

André Groult (France 1884-1966)

Folding serving table. Circa 1924.

Available.

http://www.merzbaufurniture.com

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1220896 (1)

Alvar Aalto (Finland 1898-1976)

Rare version of the “Kakkonen” stackable armchair No. 2. /15. Manufactured by Oy Huonekalu-ja Rakennustyötehdas Ab, Turku, Finland. 1930s.

UK retailers Finmar label to the underside.

A good example of Aaltos formative years and early designs; this chair is made from laminated and solid birch and retains its original black finish.

Co-designed by Alvar Aalto and Otto Korhonen in 1930, the chair was manufactured over the years as four differing versions. This version is the rarest of the four. The design is similar to one of other versions in that the front legs protrude at the side. However, the front edge of the seat on this version is formed as a more severe angle (The other version with protruding legs was rounded at the front). It also has a small decorative corner feature when seen from the front that is reminiscent of traditional Chinese chairs.

The chair was illustrated in Alvar Aalto Designer, Alvar Aalto museum p.69 and in Alvar & Aino design collection Bischofberger p.21

PoA.

http://www.merzbaufurniture.com

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1230392

P1230387

Jan van Grunsven (Dutch c20th)

This Scissor sofa was designed by architect Jan van Grunsven in 1959 and was produced by UMS/Pastoe in Utrecht. It has laminated layers of plywood and the original grey-brown wool upholstery and Dunlop foam. Van Grunsven worked as an architect in Gerrit Rietveld’s studio during the 1950s -1960s.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1270070 (1)

P1270078

Frits Spanjaard (Netherlands 1889-1978)

Elm wood table for LOV. Netherlands. 1920s

POA.

http://www.merzbau.com

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

P1280656

Jan de Jong (Nl 1917-2001)  / Dom Hans van der Laan (Nl 1904-1991)

Black stained large desk

During the reconstruction period after WWII the Dutch architect Jan de Jong and the Dutch Benedictine monk Dom Hans van der Laan collaborated on several architectural projects including the interior furniture. They created an outstanding body of work defining the the style of the Bossche School. Jan de Jong was able to translate many of Dom v.d.Laan’s idealised concepts and ideas into pioneering buildings and spaces. They worked in such close collaboration however that it is difficult to discern the individual level of input into the furniture they designed.

Dom Hans van der Laan (1904-1991) was a Dutch Benedictine monk and architect. He was a leading figure in the Dutch ‘Bossche School’.

Jan de Jong (1917-2001) was a talented craftsman-architect and student of v.d. Laan.

POA

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk