P1270445

P1270448

Cor Alons (Netherlands, 1892-1967)

Plywood and vinyl / Den Boer Gouda, 1950s.

71cm High; 36cm Wide (seat height 43cm)

Pair of rare side chairs – Their slightly ‘petit’ size means they can be used as side chairs, children’s chairs or vanity table chairs. Manufactured in the 1950s.

Price: 795 euro.

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P1170521

Ilmari Tapiovaara (Finland, 1914-1999)

model 32, ‘Wilhelmiina’ chair

Oy Wilh. Schumann AB Finland 1960s.

The Wilhelmiina 32 chair was designed in 1959. The legs are constructed in laminated birch with “fountain bend”. The suspended seat and back are in black lacquered moulded plywood.

The design is reminiscent of Alvar Aalto, whom Tapiovaara counted as a strong influence. In World War II Tapiovaara designed dugouts and field furniture to the Finnish Army, a challenging task given that only local wood and simple tools could be used, and no nails or screws were available.

Manufacturers label to the underside.

Ref: Svenskberg, Aila (ed.): Ilmari Tapiovaara: Life and Design. Translated by Jüri Kokkonen. Helsinki: Designmuseo, 2014

POA.

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P1230593

Bram van den Berg (Nl)

Stained pine wood chair.

A rare chair made after a commission from Bas van Pelt / The Hague. Circa 1953 for the youth hostel at Ockenberg-Kijckduin in The Netherlands.

This chair’s rudimentary but simple form and functional design typifies the spirit of the utilitarian design movement that surrounded the WWII period in Europe.

POA.

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P1260978

IMG_7542

Circular table retailed by Metz &Co. 1950s (designer unknown)

The table can be seen in Petra Timmer’s 1995 book Metz & Co. de Creatieve Jaren, although the table has not been attributed there to any specific designer.

POA.

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P1260690

IMG_6549

Wim den Boon (Dutch 1912-1968)

The Dutch designer Wim den Boon designed this pair of chairs in 1954 as a commission for a home in Reeuwijk, in South Holland [purchased directly from the family]. __These are the two remaining chairs of the actual four pictured in Peter Vöge’s book on Wim den Boon [Vöge,1989;p.22]. Although the design never went into production, the chairs exemplify the lasting influence of Gerrit Rietveld and early modernism during the reconstruction period after WWII when Dutch designers continued to experiment and employ a strict/pared-down use of materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture.

Oak, sprung seats with vinyl upholstery.

POA.

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0_0_0_0_343_343_csupload_64578635_large-copy

stolle_grande

 

Hein Stolle (Netherlands, 1924-2006)

Original painted plywood wall cabinet. 1950s

In the reconstruction period after the second world war, the Dutch architect and furniture designer Hein Stolle experimented with new materials and techniques for the cost effective mass-production of furniture. As a furniture designer, Stolle was a member of Groep & (which comprised Wim den Boon, Hein Stolle and Pierre Kleykamp, 1946-1950). In the early 1950s Stolle designed furniture for the distinguished department stores de Bijenkorf and Metz & Co, often in cooperation with Martin Visser. And in the 1950s and ‘60s he also designed various pieces of furniture for furniture factory ’t Spectrum.

Unique modernist wall cabinet was made for a 1953 exhibition Ons Huis, ons t’huis, (Our House, us at Home) held at De Bijenkorf warehouse in Amsterdam. The cabinet was exhibited at Wonderwood gallery’s exhibition of Stolle’s work in 2004 shortly before his death.

POA.

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Literature: Hein Stolle Architect Verteller Meubelontwerper  Publisher: Wonderwood, 2004 (book as illustrated above)