P1210857

Heals Sideboard (UK 1940s-50s)

beech and maple wood.

A small sideboard originally made for Heals, London in the 1940s-50s by Vesper furniture company (Note: The small circular hole can be seen above one drawer where the Heals label would have been). Inside the drawers are made bent beech plywood.

We have two of these available as well as a small set of drawers. We believe that the sideboard was part of a set of bedroom furniture made by Vesper furniture for Heals in very limited numbers in the late 40s/ early 50s – very rare. It has design similarities to the 1950s designs by Dutch designer Cees Braakman for Pastoe furniture.

122cm x 47cm x 77.5cm

A high quality of manufacture throughout.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk

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P1220502

Mart Stam (Netherlands 1899 – 1986)

Rush seated oak chairs

Van Der Kley, Badhoevedorp, Netherlands 1947

Stam was a Dutch architect, urban planner, and furniture designer. He was extraordinarily well-connected, and his career intersects with important moments in the history of 20th-century European architecture, including chair design at the Bauhaus, the Weissenhof estate and the Van Nelle Factory, an important modernist landmark building in Rotterdam, buildings for Ernst May’s New Frankfurt housing project then to Russia with the idealistic May Brigade, to postwar reconstruction in Germany. Stam was at the centre of c20th Modernism.

This set of four dining chairs were created for the “Goed Wonen”* .

*The Good Wonen Foundation in Amsterdam from 1946-1968 (The ‘Foundation Wonen’ until 1988) set itself the goal:

Living in the Netherlands to a higher level by improving the home furnishing in the broadest sense of the word, by promoting the production and distribution of furniture, upholstery, utensils, etc., which meet certain aesthetic, technical and social requirements .
An oak smoke chair is wrong; Rattan furniture are good. Flower wallpaper and heavy curtains are wrong; White walls and fresh shades are good!

The foundation wanted to free Dutch interior from the foul taste of the previous century. “Taste is a matter of education” was the idea behind the founding of the foundation in 1946. As a magazine and with model houses the foundation promoted the modern interior with light furniture – In this way the residents could maximise the potential of their environment and ultimately realise their own potential.

The ideas fitted well to the ideals of modernism; improving homes and furnishings as well as the people within them and society as a whole.

POA.

http://www.merzbau.co.uk

website: http://www.merzbau.vpweb.co.uk