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Alexandre Noll (France, 1890-1970)

Lidded ebony wood box, signed

French sculptor and woodworker was well know for his dogmatic belief in wood, both as a material and for its spiritual qualities; the relationship between humankind and nature. His works extend to domestic objects and sometimes into the realm of sculpture – Noll was one of the most important forces in the mid-c20th who actively maintained the need to blur the distinctions between the arts and the crafts. His work reveals the organic continuity in all objects.

This exceptionally large sized, important piece by the artist (approx. 22cm long) has been carved in two parts from one large piece of dark madagascan ebony wood. It is signed underneath by the artist.

POA.

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Dom Hans vd Laan / Jan de Jong  (Dutch c20th)

Three bench/ chair sections. These were designed made by the architect/Benedictine monk and architect Jan de Jong in the 1970s as part of a commission for a personal library.

 

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Jan Slothouber & William Graatsma (Dutch c20th+)

Five rare modular cubes from the 1970s.

Laminated plywood.

The Dutch team of Slothouber & Graatsma established themselves from the 1950s as artist/designers with the cube form as their key motif around which they developed various principles of cubic construction alongside multiples and variations thereof. Despite its restrictions they admired the cube for its clarity of form. They applied their thinking around it to a variety of objects, and artworks from small jewellery-scale 3d models and games to larger installation works.
Highly driven personalities, they considered themselves as discoverers of ‘the many applications of the democratic system of cubics’; a system that would ostensively act to counter the rise of the expressive individualism in post-WWII culture. (They later established the CCC_the Center for Cubic Constructions as a forum for promoting their ideas).
Due to their diverse and multidisciplinary output they were never to become global names – But they were a highly respected creative team (representing The Netherlands at the Venice Biennale in 1970)…Donald Judd for one was a great admirer of their work.

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Poul Kjærholm (Denmark 1929-1980)

PK55 Ash wood and brushed steel dining table

1970s production. (Unmarked)

The use of steel and Allen bolts to connect the frames allowed Kjaerholm to avoid the, sometimes, imprecise process of welding. It also fulfilled his desire to show how the frames were connected, thus providing a clear legibility to his designs, and led him towards creating his first work desk and compatible chair – the PK 55 and PK 11, which appeared in 1957.

The simple looking build of the PK55 table belies a much more interesting design than is apparent at first glance. The steel base frame is actually composed of four lengths of flat steel, intersecting at each corner, with the short end leg propping up the longer, width-spanning leg. Each leg element is held together yet simultaneously pushed slightly apart with Allen bolts to give the base frame an even lighter profile and also to reveal the four separate planes.

This work table features an ash table top and satin brushed steel frame.

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Paul Johann Bay (Switzerland 1889-1952)

Rare Anthroposophical carved ash wood table lamp
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Bay was a collaborator of Rudolf Steiner and an independent architect in the offices of Dorlach, Goethaneum after 1914.

(With some provenance)

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Dutch 1930s – Modernist shelving unit.
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provenance: Johanna Erna Else Schröder (1918 – 1992)
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Johanna Erna Else Schröder (known as Han Schröder) lived in the  in Utrecht, the Netherlands, together with her mother, Truus  Schröder- Schrader who was also an interior decorator. The house was designed in 1924 by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld who became a friend of Schröder’s and an important influence on her future work. While a teenager, she worked on furniture design with both Rietveld and with Gerard van de Groenekan. In 1936, she attended the  Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, graduating as an architect in 1940.
This small De Stijl / Art Deco / Modernist shelving unit was previously owned by Han Schroeder /Schröder. After the death of Han the family auctioned off her belongings including this table. It is possibly a Gerrit Rietveld design – although a definite attribution can not be given.
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